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" Live out of your imagination

not your history "

Stephen R. Covey

I have become a Muggletonian

November 6th, 2007

“Following Reeve’s death and the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, Muggletonianism split and dwindled, and Muggleton developed a new doctrine that, since God no longer intervened in the world, prayer, formal services and evangelism were useless…
The sect, though always small, maintained a continuous existence for nearly three hundred years. Interest in Muggletonianism revived in the 1750s, because of parallels with the teaching of Swedenborg, and again in the late 1820s, when many of the early texts were reprinted. As late as the 1920s, diminishing numbers continued to gather at annual festivals to read the founders’ writings and sing their hymns. When the “Last Muggletonian,” Mr. Phillip Noakes of Matfield, Kent, died in 1979, the movement’s extensive archives went to the British Library.”

http://www.sc.edu/library/spcoll/hist/muggle.html 

Being serious in the wrong way

November 6th, 2007

We are all guilty, I suspect, of mostly swimming in a world of like-minded thought – only attending to those we agree with. So I thought I’d dip into someone I suspect I have little affinity for – C.S.Lewis. In the following quote he says something so odd I can hardly understand him. A prize to anyone who can decode this: “You could almost say they (lovers) put on nakedness as a ceremonial robe – or as the costume for a charade. For we must still be aware-and never more than when we thus partake of the Pagan sacrament in our love-passages of being serious in the wrong way.”

Here it is in context:

“Are we not our true selves when naked? In a sense, no. The word naked was originally a past participle; the naked man was the man who had undergone a process of naking, that is, of stripping or peeling (you used the verb of nuts and fruit). Time out of mind the naked man has seemed to our ancestors not the natural but the abnormal man; not the man who has abstained from dressing but the man who has been for some reason undressed. And it is a simple fact – anyone can observe it at a men’s bathing place-that nudity emphasises common humanity and soft-pedals what is individual. In that way we are “more ourselves” when clothed. By nudity the lovers cease to be solely John and Mary; the universal He and She are emphasised. You could almost say they put on nakedness as a ceremonial robe-or as the costume for a charade. For we must still be aware-and never more than when we thus partake of the Pagan sacrament in our love-passages of being serious in the wrong way. The Sky-Father himself is only a Pagan dream of One far greater than Zeus and far more masculine than the male. And a mortal man is not even the Sky-Father, and cannot really wear his crown. Only a copy of it, done in tinselled paper. I do not call it this in contempt. I like ritual; I like private theatricals; I even like charades. Paper crowns have their legitimate, and (in the proper context) their serious, uses. They are not in the last resort much flimsier (“if imagination mend them”) than all earthly dignities.” (from The Four Loves, C.S.Lewis)

Thought for the Day

November 6th, 2007

In order to swim one takes off all one’s clothes – in order to aspire to the truth one must undress in a far more inward sense, divest oneself of all one’s inward clothes, of thoughts, conceptions, selfishness etc. before one is sufficiently naked.
Søren Kierkegaard (1813-55), Danish philosopher. The Journals of Søren Kierkegaard: A Selection, no. 1395, (ed. and tr. by Alexander Dru, 1938), entry for 1854.