Archive for February, 2008

 

Quote for the day

Monday, February 25th, 2008
frankl-h250-home-page.jpgWhen we can no longer change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.
Viktor Frankl 

Orson Welles, Nakedness & Radishes

Saturday, February 16th, 2008

I’m on the hunt of the peculiar convergence of nakedness, spirituality and root vegetables that I am starting to discern in various works of art.

In an earlier post I mentioned Alanis Morisette’s powerful song Thank U, which conveys spiritual ideas, but also bizarrely mentions carrots. You can see her singing it here. It is a beautiful little film that shows her singing the song naked in urban settings – streets, trains, supermarkets – and most people ignore her. But occasionally her message touches them and they acknowledge her. Wonderful!

And here’s another film clip – showing, some say, the most important moment in the history of cinema. From F For Fake, released in 1974, Orson Welles sings the praises of Chartres Cathedral. Again spirituality, nakedness and root vegetables come together – but this time it’s radishes.

Something very odd is going on here…

Picture of the Day

Saturday, February 16th, 2008

Bartolomo Veneto, “The Man and the Labyrinth”bveneto2.jpg

From the excellent website The Endicott Studio 

Time of the Sixth Sun

Monday, February 11th, 2008

There’s a new genre of film now which is being called a ‘Notion Picture’ – ie a film that gets you thinking.

Here’s a trailer for a film being made by someone who recently contacted me:

Quote for the day

Monday, February 11th, 2008

My diary offers a quote for the day. Today’s is splendid:

Great men never feel great; small men never feel small.

Wasted my whole life getting comfortable

Thursday, February 7th, 2008

An online magazine in the USA and now the BBC are encouraging readers to write 6 word stories or autobiographies.

The title of this post is an example of one of these, written by Richard Merrington for the BBC site.

This is such a perfect challenge for those interested in story-telling and the Bardic arts!

Here’s the backstory as the BBC explains it:

In the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway bet ten dollars that he could write a complete story in just six words. He wrote: “For Sale: baby shoes, never worn.”  He won the bet.  

You can see readers’ efforts at ‘Smith’, the magazine site, and others on the BBC site.

In the woods is perpetual youth

Thursday, February 7th, 2008

EmersonOne of the inspirations of this blog is the Transcendentalism initiated by Emerson, Thoreau and others. Emerson’s essay ‘Nature’, although short, really started the whole movement, and stands as a good reminder to writers that they don’t have to produce reams to make a difference in the world. Here’s a section:

Crossing a bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight, under a clouded sky, without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink of fear. In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the woods, is perpetual youth. Within these plantations of God, a decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival is dressed, and the guest sees not how he should tire of them in a thousand years.
In the woods, we return to reason and faith. There I feel that nothing can befall me in life, — no disgrace, no calamity, (leaving me my eyes,) which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground, — my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space, — all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eye-ball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or particle of God. …

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature, 1836

The Alanis Morisette Nude Suit Revisited

Tuesday, February 5th, 2008

In an earlier post I talked about the way in which the Canadian singer Alanis Morisette attempted to challenge our views on the naked body by dressing in a nude suit on television.

If you’ve seen photos of this, you’ll know that her suit wasn’t exactly haute couture. It was of the kind on sale in costume party shops.

I’ve now discovered a German artist who has produced a range of clothing worthy of Alanis. It’s very elegant and sophisticated. It’s haute couture. Have a look here.

Do you think one would get arrested for wearing it in, say, London or San Fransisco? Anyone willing to find out?

And could somebody tell Alanis?

PS This is one of the most frequently viewed pages on this blog. If you’re into Alanis a much more interesting post about her, plus video is here.

Synergy

Friday, February 1st, 2008

The other day I met up with Rupert Davis, a talented photographer who has produced some fantastic images of Nature, sacred landscapes and sacred sites. I mentioned his work to Damh in the OBOD office, and like a wizard working over a bubbling cauldron he has combined the sequence of ideas I suggested in an earlier blog post with some of Rupert’s images and some of his partner’s Cerri, together with a song of Laura Powers, to produce this: